About

Moms on Watch was started BY moms FOR moms to make sure mother’s milk is affordable and accessible to ALL who need it.

About

The nutrients in breast milk are essential to allow for the healthy development of infants, especially preterm infants. While mother’s own milk is ideal, many factors may prevent that from happening. Mothers who have a preterm infant in the neonatal intensive care unit can have decreased milk supply, and their babies who were born prematurely depend on human milk for survival. 

Families who have infants with special feeding needs, or who have adopted an infant also often need donor breast milk. In these circumstances and others, it is so critical that infants still have access to high quality breast milk from milk donors. ACCESS means AFFORDABLE. ACCESS means AVAILABLE. If donor milk is not affordable and available across the country then it is not truly accessible. And if our infants cannot get the milk supply that they need, their health and even their lives are at risk.  We are concerned that Big Pharma—in the form of a company called Prolacta Biosciences Inc, is attempting to make hundreds of millions of dollars on mother’s milk and selling it at huge profits.  We are concerned that Prolacta is trying to monopolize the business of donor breast milk through predatory business practices and make massive profits by charging so much that only wealthy communities can get it.

Big Pharma knows that moms will pay WHATEVER IT TAKES to keep our babies healthy and we’re worried that they will exploit this fact. We are worried they will disenfranchise smaller mother’s milk collectives, putting them out of business for the purposes of monopolizing the industry. All in the name of making more money for venture capitalists directly profiting off mothers and babies in need. 

We are calling on Prolacta (and any other companies selling mother’s milk) and asking them:  

  1. What are their intentions for this part of their business, people or profit? 

  2. Will they commit to reasonable pricing and put price caps on their mother’s milk? 

  3. What else will they do to make sure that mother’s milk is affordable to ALL moms and ALL infants? 

  4. Will they agree not to engage in malicious lawsuits against other milk banks? 

  5. The milk banking community should be fighting for the lives of sick babies, not fighting for their very existence against predatory behavior.  Will they commit to the fair competition pledge and stop disenfranchising existing mother’s milk banks? 

  6. Will they agree to not disenfranchise existing milk banks.

At the end of the day if other milk banks are run out of business then prices will go up and accessibility will go down. If you’re interested in supporting our movement, Prolacta, their board members and financial backers and ask them these critical questions. If you know of other big pharma companies selling mother’s milk, let us know and we will add them to the list.

Daisy Murphy